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Adam Machanic

Adam Machanic, Boston-based SQL Server developer, shares his experiences with programming, monitoring, and performance tuning SQL Server. And the occasional battle with the query optimizer.

Kimberly Tripp on SQL CLR: "Microsoft has put in the work to give the DBA control over this technology."

Widely acknowledged SQL Server expert Kimberly Tripp has weighed in on SQL Server 2005's CLR integration in her latest blog post.

Tripp presents a fairly balanced reaction to the new technology, and stresses a message I've been trying to hit home recently: Given the massive number of changes coming in SQL Server 2005, DBAs must learn all aspects of SQL Server, at least enough to veto bad ideas from the development side. DBAs cannot rest on these changes. There is too much; and developers, unlike DBAs, get excited and want to implement now, not wait until a technology is proven. DBAs will need to know how to properly argue when the time comes.

Tripp also points out that set-based T-SQL is still the clear winner in most cases. T-SQL has been expanded with lots of new features that will help get rid of cursors and loops: Recursive CTEs, row numbering, and the APPLY operator are some of the more important ones on the list. Before you consider migration to SQL CLR, look at these new features. They may solve whatever problem you're having better and in a more performant fashion than CLR methods will.


Published Wednesday, July 12, 2006 10:41 PM by Adam Machanic
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About Adam Machanic

Adam Machanic is a Boston-based SQL Server developer, writer, and speaker. He focuses on large-scale data warehouse performance and development, and is author of the award-winning SQL Server monitoring stored procedure, sp_WhoIsActive. Adam has written for numerous web sites and magazines, including SQLblog, Simple Talk, Search SQL Server, SQL Server Professional, CoDe, and VSJ. He has also contributed to several books on SQL Server, including "SQL Server 2008 Internals" (Microsoft Press, 2009) and "Expert SQL Server 2005 Development" (Apress, 2007). Adam regularly speaks at conferences and training events on a variety of SQL Server topics. He is a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) for SQL Server, a Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP), and an alumnus of the INETA North American Speakers Bureau.

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